“Science needs art to supply the metaphors that generate new science.”

Some dueling blogposts on the relationship of art and science can be found on National Public Radio’s website.  Read this one first, and then this one.

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About artsoceducation

Pat Wayne is Director of Programs and Education for Arts Orange County, the county-wide arts council. She is also a parent in the Saddleback School District and past PTA President. The arts transformed her life in the second grade and she went on to major in theater design and earn a Master's in Arts Administration.
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2 Responses to “Science needs art to supply the metaphors that generate new science.”

  1. There are many many blogs that pay attention to the art science nexus. From my short time investigating this intersection, Chicago has to be the most prominent example of a single city that does this very well on a large scale. But having said that, it’s a new paradigm that’s sweeping the world, which isn’t so new because science and art emerged from the free thinking singlarity at the start of the renaissance. My blog SaCrIT: Art Science Blog focuses directly on this topic covering a wide variety of artists or groups and indeed exhibitions in my local area that play a role in both these fields. From what i’ve been able to gather, there are a few blogs very much like mine that will only focus on science art nexus, such as ArtInScience, ArtofScience and SciArtSci

    And then there are those that focus on specific examples of art and science mixing such as Earthquake art, Nature is Data, BioArt etc. The list is almost endless and increasing every week. It’s an interesting and subject and as soon as the intersection starts to look more like a blur, the more we’ll see it in everything we do. I think it has a particularly important role in communication and education about scientific methods/principles etc. It’s very exciting.

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